REVISITING PATRIARCHAL DISLOCATION OF TODAY’S AFRICAN WOMAN: A STIWANIST EXPLORATION OF THE FICTION OF THREE AFRICAN WOMEN

Published: September, 2020

Author(s):

Anyanwu Patricia Ngozi

About Author(s):

Department of English and Communication Studies,

Federal University Otuoke, Bayelsa State

 

Download PDF

Abstract

It is naïve to think that the twenty-first century African woman is free from the patriarchal powers that held her ancestral mothers down. Even though she is arguably no longer a fetcher of water and a hewer of wood, she is still bedeviled by myriads of patriarchally imposed limitations which militate against the attainment of her full potentials. Today, her limitations are multifaceted: as a minor, she is neglected, given out in marriage and sexually abused by men, as a youth, she is battered, raped, trafficked and even killed by men, as a mother, she is objectified and abandoned “in the other room” with the burden of motherhood by her domineering male partner. These realities and more are voiced through reputable national dailies, as well as the fiction of most African female writers, including Chika Unigwe, Akachi Ezeigbo and Amma Darko. In On Black Sisters’ Street, Trafficked and Faceless respectively, these three African women have engaged the scholarship of the novel in order to dramatize the woman’s current deplorable realities which result in her exclusion from active participation in her nation’s scheme of things. Using the Nigerian and Ghanaian societies as settings for this unfortunate dislocation, we shall adopt Molara Ogundipe-Leslie’s “STIWANISM” strand of Feminist theoretical paradigm in order to show how these three female writers have engaged their creativities in expressing the multifaceted ways of dislocating today’s African woman. This is with the aim of reinvigorating the call for her protection, education, employment and inclusion in the drive for her nation’s development, irrespective of her economic background.

Key Words: Africa, Woman, Patriarchy, Dislocation, Stiwanism