PROBLEMS OF FRENCH-IGBO PROSE TRANSLATION: VINCENT OKEKE AND HIS IGBO TRANSLATORS

Published: March, 2020

Author(s):

Ihechi Obisike Nkoro, Livinus Kelechukwu Eke & Emeka Innocent Iwunze

 

About Author(s):

Department of Foreign Language and Translation Studies

Abia State University, Uturu

 

Download PDF

Abstract

Literature continues to play an undeniable role in modern societies. A national literature becomes an international literature when its readership transcends national boundaries. Consequently, many African writers choose international languages like English, French, German or Arabic as their languages of expression of African culture. However, a few African writers concerned about the development of indigenous African languages use indigenous African languages as their languages of expression knowing fully well that such works will have a limited readership and may never be recognized at the international scene. It is noteworthy that translated literature often forms the literary compendium of English, French, German Arabic and other international languages. Achebe and Soyinka are read by Francophones while Oyono and Bâ are read by Anglophones through the efforts of literary translators. Furthermore, through literary translators’ efforts Igbo readers can read the French Author Molière while French readers can read the Igbo author, Nwana. This study sets out to evaluate the problems encountered in translating Okeke’s French novel Le Syndrome 419: Le Frère Terrible (2001), into Igbo as Mpụ 419: Nwanne Omekome

 

Keywords: Prose, Okeke, French, Igbo, translation, problems