CAN NIGERIAN LANGUAGES TRANSMIT MODERN SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNOLOGICAL CULTURES?

PUBLISHED: June 2018

Author: OKEKE, VINCENT O.

Imo State University, Owerri

SUMMARY

It is the general belief by experts (Chuka Okonkwo”2002; E. Hoff, 2009, Joseph Kizerbo, 1966: Fishman J.A.: 1984, etc…) that the mother tongue is the best medium for the child to acquire knowledge at school. The child is more at ease in understanding and tackling problems in the language he is used to than in the one that he hardly has a better grip of. It takes years for a Nigerian child, long after even he has finished his secondary education to have a mastery of the English language, so that one can logically conclude that all the knowledge dispensed in earlier years at school have simply been half understood. Now, to what extent can the option of using the mother tongue be viable in the acquisition of modern technological cultures? Can Nigerian languages be structurally adequate in dispensing higher knowledge in science and technology? Our paper agrees that they are all structurally capable to transmit these higher cultures but under certain conditions of rehabilitation and greater attention by stake holders. No language is superior to another from the linguistic point of view so that what one can do, others can equally do provided there is determination and hard work.

Download Pdf