AFRICAN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE IN THE AGE OF GLOBALIZATION: AN INDIGENOUS PERSPECTIVE

AUTHOR: GOIN LINDA & NJOKU  ANTHONY

PUBLISHED: MARCH 2018

Abstract

Comparative Literature is at the incipient stage of development in Africa despite the fact that it has existed more than a century in Europe and America, and so Africa’s strides in the domain are simply not yet recognized by the official Masters of global history. As if Mephistopheles in Goethe’s Doctor Faustus is saying to African Comparative Literature and its scholars “woe unto you, late comer”, this late arrival haunts African comparative literature and makes it difficult for it to embrace globalization when its identity is still at the teething stage. African comparative literature therefore risks compromise in the face of abrasive globalization. What will be the future of African comparative literature in the age of globalization? To answer the question, this paper first suggests that literatures in African indigenous languages should form the basis of our comparative practices and again that these writings in indigenous languages be part of Africa’s contribution to the global dialogue of cultures. This is the only way its identity could be protected and preserved.

Key-words: Globalization, African comparative literature, works in indigenous African languages.

FULL PDF DOWNLOAD: March 2018 PDF